Château de la Bourlie

A luxury chateau to rent near Bergerac in the Dordogne, France

With its limstone castle, tall tower, stone chapel and tri-coloured rose garden, this 13th-century fortress in the heart of the Dordogne really is fit for a king.

Sleeps: 12

Possibility of 6 extra guests in the converted wing La Fournail

Price Guide 2021:

Prices available on request

Service:

  • Daily maid service
  • Cook

Accommodation:

  • 6 double bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms

Facilities:

  • Pool
  • Large outdoor dinning table
  • TV/DVD & WiFi

General:

  • Private airfield 15 mins
  • Bergerac airport 1 hr
  • Bordeaux airport 2 hrs 20 mins

Hidden away in the sleepy Dordogne hills, 13th-century Château de la Bourlie has remained in the same family for more than seven centuries.

Today it’s still very much a family home, with an unfussy elegance that’s part of its whimsical charm. The current owner is a well-know contemporary artist who has filled the place with heirlooms, flea-market finds and quirky antiques from his travels, as well as his own modern art.

The château comprises two separate wings and one of those conical towers that no self-respecting château would be without. One of the wings, La Fournail, across the courtyard from the main chateau, can house six additional guests, though it’s a little more rustic in style than the main house.

Outside, just beyond the chapel, is the garden, complete with linden alley and 250 varieties of roses. Past that are 135 hectares of farmland and 488 hectares of walnut, chestnut, oak and poplar.

The house has featured in several international magazines, including Conde Nast Traveller, and has been refurbished to a very high standard.

Although the castle has belonged to his kin since the Middle Ages, current owner Cyril de Commarque treats all his guests like they’re part of the family.

Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
Subscribe to our newsletter
We will send you news about villas and destinations.
ErrorHere